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GARDEN CALENDAR   PRINT VERISON

JANUARY
  • Get free tree seedlings on Friday Jan 19 for Florida Arbor Day. Call 209-0430 for locations.
  • Transplant hardy items while they are dormant to prevent shock. Move tropicals come spring.
  • Do not prune cold damaged plants until spring.
  • Order seeds of Florida recommended vegetable varieties
  • If you cover plant to protect from cold, cover like a tent do not cinch around the trunk.
  • Inspect holly, camellia, evergreens for scale insects on leaf backs can apply oil spray.
  • Dormant lawns need less water, irrigate weekly. Over watering, encourages weed activity.

  • FEBRUARY
  • Apply a dormant oil spray if scale insects are on camellias, sagos, or hollies.
  • Put organic amendments in garden and planting beds several weeks before planting.
  • Start flower & vegetable seeds for spring transplanting.
  • Complete pruning of dormant trees, shrubs, and roses.
  • Do NOT prune hydrangeas, azaleas or climbing roses.
  • There is still time to transplant shrubbery this month.
  • Fertilize citrus & other fruit trees late this month.
  • Check pH in new beds to see if its changed. Bring soil samples to EXT office for pH testing.

  • MARCH
  • Fertilize the lawn with slow release fertilizer if needed, once grass has greened up.
  • Spring plantings should be hand watered daily for 2 weeks, to hasten establishment.
  • Prune and fertilize azaleas, camellias and spireas, once blooming has finished.
  • Make sure you keep newly planted shrubs well watered to hasten establishment.
  • Vegetables should be planted by mid-March (esp tomatoes) to assure good harvest in time.
  • Take advantage of discarded oak leaves by incorporating into beds or use as a mulch.
  • As plants begin to grow, adjust irrigation timer on 12th for DST watering schedule.

  • APRIL
  • Check weekly for insects or diseases invading your lawn or new growth of landscape plants.
  • Keep annual flowers blooming by pinching expired blossoms. Install heat tolerant annuals.
  • Feed vegetables & fruit trees per fertilizer label.
  • Keep vegetables picked as they ripen. This discourages pests and can increase production.
  • Sod can be placed to repair winter kill. If using grass seed water daily until grass emerges.
  • Check palms for nutrient deficiencies and correct with palm fertilizer.
  • Be on the lookout for citrus leaf miners on new leaves. Apply oil spray to deter activity.
  • Attend EPIC Flower Expo at the Ag. Center each mid-April.

  • MAY
  • Prep for hurricane season by knowing how to secure patio furniture, potted plants, etc.
  • Replenish mulch to conserve water & combat weeds. Mulch should be three in deep, max.
  • Fertilize fruit trees to maximize production.
  • Inspect St Augustine grass for chinch bug damage in hot sunny areas. Active now until Nov 30.
  • Check trees and shrubs for nutritional needs.
  • Stay on top of weeds by pulling them or use sprays until prohibited by 90ļ F temps.
  • This could be a dry month. Watch for signs of water stress in plants.
  • Apply for a Master Gardener Class.

  • JUNE
  • Remove fading vegetable & flower plants from the garden. Leaving them will encourage pests.
  • Plant field peas or sweet potato cover crop if veg garden to remain fallow during summer.
  • Turn off irrigation systems when natural rainfall occurs. This can reduce pest activity.
  • Control weeds in gardens so they do not seed.
  • If rainy, insect and disease populations are rising. Scout to see if controls are warranted.
  • Watch for manganese deficiency on new growth of palms & cycads, especially along coastline.
  • Inspect lawns for chinch bugs. Treat active areas five feet out, not the entire yard.

  • JULY
  • St. Augustine lawns may require an iron application if they appear yellow.
  • Check supplies in your hurricane kit for freshness and know your evacuation route.
  • Use a rain gauge to track rainfall and utilize irrigation system accordingly.
  • Pull up dying annuals or vegetables so they do not harbor pests
  • Plants will root well from cuttings now. A 4-6 inch cutting is desirable.
  • Empty containers with rainwater to deter mosquitoes.
  • Take frequent breaks & stay HYDRATED when outdoors. Limit outdoor activities to dusk & dawn.
  • Solar treatment of soil in vegetable gardens will help control nematodes.

  • AUGUST
  • Insect populations peak, scout landscape weekly. Apply controls as needed.
  • Start seeds indoors for the fall or cool-season garden.
  • During wet periods, check for fungus (brown areas in lawns). Cease irrigation helps.
  • When pruning palms remove browned fronds only, never green ones.
  • Last month to plant grass seed and expect good results. Water daily until sprouting occurs.
  • Trim back tropical plants like plumbagos, lantana, and hibiscus as they flower on new growth.

  • SEPTEMBER
  • Plant most vegetables early this month to produce before our first killing frost.
  • Fertilize young trees and shrubs to increase cold hardiness. 8-0-8 or 10-0-10 will work.
  • Give your lawn and fruit trees their final fertilization for the year.
  • Divide bulbs to reduce competition and encourage blooms.
  • Amaryllis do not need a rest period. Divide daylilies and replant.
  • Continue checking lawn for pest damage and reduce populations with appropriate treatment.
  • Donít prune poinsettias after Sept 10, as it may interfere with flowering in December.

  • OCTOBER
  • Plant cold-hardy trees and shrubs to give them a long establishment period before spring.
  • Plant herbs to use in holiday meals.
  • Keep inspecting for pests. Insects will feed heavily in preparation for winter.
  • Transplant perennials. Mulch heavily and keep the soil moist to hasten their establishment.
  • Use fallen leaves for compost and mulch.
  • Root prune plants you intend to transplant this Winter.
  • Plant mums or petunias for fall flower display.
  • Last month to prune evergreen landscape plants until Spring.
  • Attend the Datil Pepper Fall Festival Oct. 7 & 8 at the St. Johns Co. Extension Office.
  • Clean up potted outdoor plants before bringing inside for winter. Check for insects, etc.

  • NOVEMBER
  • Remember to mulch plants for cold protection Use leaves or pine needles for free mulch.
  • Reduce irrigation on Nov. 1 to once weekly.
  • Check camellias, hollies, sagos & pittosporums for scale. Control with dormant oil spray.
  • Plant ryegrass seed now for a green winter lawn. Sow 10 pounds/1,000 sq. ft.
  • Proper time to plant onions & strawberries.
  • Plant alyssum, dianthus, pansy, petunias and snapdragons for winter color.
  • Have frost covers handy just in case. Our first freeze can occur around Thanksgiving.
  • Register for our December centerpiece class, call 209-0430 for more information.
  • Wildflower seeds can be sown this month.

  • DECEMBER
  • Continue to transplant small trees and shrubs during their dormant phase.
  • Plant a camellia for winter color in the yard.
  • Water plants heavily at least 24 hours before freeze...helps to increase cold tolerance.
  • Group outdoor potted plants tightly to increase cold resistance.
  • Ryegrass will need to be fertilized and mowed.
  • Many bulbs can be planted now for spring and summer bloom for next year.
  • Place holiday plants in good sunlight and cool temperatures for long-lasting blooms.
  • Prune dormant, fruit and ornamental trees, now.
  • Harvest all citrus, only if a freeze below 28 degrees is expected to last for several hours.
  • Do not harvest just because a freeze is predicted.
  • Have a Happy Holiday Season!